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Saturday, 23 July 2016 15:23

Top 15+ causes of obesity in children with (Photos and Video)

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Causes of obesity essay and the Prevention of obesity

Obesity is a condition where a person has accumulated so much body fat that it might have a negative effect on their health. If a person's bodyweight is at least 20% higher than it should be, he or she is considered obese. If your Body Mass Index (BMI) is between 25 and 29.9 you are considered overweight

The term 'obese' describes a person who's very overweight, with a lot of body fat. Obesity is the situation of being too fat or overweight. Therefore the most common causes of obesity are overeating and physical inactivity. Ultimately, body weight is the result of genetics, metabolism, environment, behavior, and culture. Genetics, a person is more likely to develop obesity if one or both parents are obese it’s a common problem that is estimated to affect around one in every four adults and around one in every five children aged 10 to 11.

Defining obesity

There are many ways in which a person's health in relation to their weight can be classified, but the most widely used method is body mass index (BMI).

BMI is a measure of whether you're a healthy weight for your height. You can use the BMI healthy weight calculator to work out your score.

For most adults, a BMI of:

18.5 to 24.9 means you're a healthy weight

25 to 29.9 means you're overweight

30 to 39.9 means you're obese

40 or above means you're severely obese

BMI isn't used to definitively diagnose obesity, because people who are very muscular sometimes have a high BMI without excess fat. But for most people, BMI is a useful indication of whether they're a healthy weight, overweight or obese.

A better measure of excess fat is waist circumference, which can be used as an additional measure in people who are overweight (with a BMI of 25 to 29.9) or moderately obese (with a BMI of 30 to 34.9).

Generally, men with a waist circumference of 94cm (37in) or more and women with a waist circumference of 80cm (about 31.5in) or more are more likely to develop obesity-related health problems.

Risks of obesity

It's very important to take steps to tackle obesity because, as well as causing obvious physical changes, it can lead to a number of serious and potentially life-threatening conditions, such as:

  • type 2 diabetes
  • coronary heart disease
  • some types of cancer, such as breast cancer and bowel cancer
  • stroke

Obesity can also affect your quality of life and lead to psychological problems, such as depression and low self-esteem.

Causes of obesity

Obesity is generally caused by eating too much and moving too little.

If you consume high amounts of energy, particularly fat and sugars, but don't burn off the energy through exercise and physical activity, much of the surplus energy will be stored by the body as fat.

Calories

The energy value of food is measured in units called calories. The average physically active man needs about 2,500 calories a day to maintain a healthy weight, and the average physically active woman needs about 2,000 calories a day.

This amount of calories may sound high, but it can be easy to reach if you eat certain types of food. For example, eating a large takeaway hamburger, fries and a milkshake can total 1,500 calories – and that's just one meal. For more information, read our guide to understanding calories.

Another problem is that many people aren't physically active, so lots of the calories they consume end up being stored in their body as fat.

Poor diet

Obesity doesn't happen overnight. It develops gradually over time, as a result of poor diet and lifestyle choices, such as:

  • Eating large amounts of processed or fast food – that's high in fat and sugar
  • Drinking too much alcohol – alcohol contains a lot of calories, and people who drink heavily are often overweight
  • Eating out a lot – you may be tempted to also have a starter or dessert in a restaurant, and the food can be higher in fat and sugar
  • Eating larger portions than you need – you may be encouraged to eat too much if your friends or relatives are also eating large portions
  • Drinking too many sugary drinks – including soft drinks and fruit juice
  • Comfort eating – if you have low self-esteem or feel depressed, you may eat to make yourself feel better
  • Unhealthy eating habits tend to run in families. You may learn bad eating habits from your parents when you're young and continue them into adulthood.

 Lack of physical activity

Lack of physical activity is another important factor related to obesity. Many people have jobs that involve sitting at a desk for most of the day. They also rely on their cars, rather than walking or cycling.

For relaxation, many people tend to watch TV, browse the internet or play computer games, and rarely take regular exercise.

If you're not active enough, you don't use the energy provided by the food you eat, and the extra energy you consume is stored by the body as fat.

The Department of Health recommends that adults do at least 150 minutes (two-and-a-half hours) of moderate-intensity aerobic activity, such as cycling or fast walking, every week. This doesn’t need to be done all in one go, but can be broken down into smaller periods. For example, you could exercise for 30 minutes a day for five days a week.

If you're obese and trying to lose weight, you may need to do more exercise than this. It may help to start off slowly and gradually increase the amount of exercise you do each week.

Genetics

Some people claim there's no point trying to lose weight because "it runs in my family" or "it's in my genes". While there are some rare genetic conditions that can cause obesity, such as Prader-Willi syndrome, there's no reason why most people can't lose weight.

It may be true that certain genetic traits inherited from your parents – such as having a large appetite – may make losing weight more difficult, but it certainly doesn't make it impossible. In many cases, obesity is more to do with environmental factors, such as poor eating habits learned during childhood.

Medical reasons

In some cases, underlying medical conditions may contribute to weight gain. These include:

  • An underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism) – where your thyroid gland doesn't produce enough hormones
  • Cushing's syndrome – a rare disorder that causes the over-production of steroid hormones

However, if conditions such as these are properly diagnosed and treated, they should pose less of a barrier to weight loss.

Certain medicines, including some corticosteroids, medications for epilepsy and diabetes, and some medications used to treat mental illness – including antidepressants and medicines for schizophrenia – can contribute to weight gain.

Weight gain can sometimes be a side effect of stopping smoking.

Treating obesity

The best way to treat obesity is to eat a healthy, reduced-calorie diet and exercise regularly. To do this you should:

  • Eat a balanced, calorie-controlled diet as recommended by your GP or weight loss management health professional (such as a dietitian)
  • Join a local weight loss group
  • Take up activities such as fast walking, jogging, swimming or tennis for 150 to 300 minutes (two-and-a-half to five hours) a week
  • Eat slowly and avoid situations where you know you could be tempted to overeat
  • You may also benefit from receiving psychological support from a trained healthcare professional to help change the way you think about food and eating.

If lifestyle changes alone don't help you lose weight, a medication called orlistat may be recommended. If taken correctly, this medication works by reducing the amount of fat you absorb during digestion. Your GP will know whether orlistat is suitable for you. In rare cases, weight loss surgery may be recommended.

Other obesity-related problems

Obesity can cause a number of further problems, including difficulties with daily activities and serious health conditions.

Day-to-day problems related to obesity include:

  • Breathlessness
  • Increased sweating
  • Snoring
  • Difficulty doing physical activity
  • Often feeling very tired
  • Joint and back pain
  • Low confidence and self-esteem
  • Feeling isolated
  • The psychological problems associated with being obese can also affect your relationships with family and friends, and may lead to depression.
  • Serious health conditions

 Being obese can also increase your risk of developing many potentially serious health conditions, including:

  • Type 2 diabetes – a condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high
  • High blood pressure
  • High cholesterol and atherosclerosis (where fatty deposits narrow your arteries), which can lead to coronary heart disease and stroke
  • Asthma
  • Metabolic syndrome – a combination of diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity
  • Several types of cancer, including bowel cancer, breast cancer and womb cancer
  • Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GORD) – where stomach acid leaks out of the stomach and into the esophagus (gullet)
  • Gallstones – small stones, usually made of cholesterol, that form in the gallbladder
  • Reduced fertility
  • Osteoarthritis – a condition involving pain and stiffness in your joints
  • Sleep apnea – a condition that causes interrupted breathing during sleep, which can lead to daytime sleepiness with an increased risk of road traffic accidents, as well as a greater risk of diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease
  • Liver disease and kidney disease
  • Pregnancy complications, such as gestational diabetes or pre-eclampsia (when a woman experiences a potentially dangerous rise in blood pressure during pregnancy)

Obesity reduces life expectancy by an average of 3 to 10 years, depending on how severe it is. It's estimated that obesity and being overweight contribute to at least 1 in every 13 deaths

CLICK THE LINK BELOW TO WATCH SHOCKING VIDEO

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=64yAzs5ywlc

 

Sourcehttp://www.nhs.uk

 

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Read 121319 times Last modified on Saturday, 07 January 2017 03:23

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